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Get Storming the Heavens: Soldiers, Emperors, and Civilians in PDF

By Antonio Santosuosso

ISBN-10: 0813341604

ISBN-13: 9780813341606

The luck of the Roman empire was once mostly because of the prowess of the legions yet, likewise, a disillusioned army used to be additionally answerable for a few of the maximum threats to the empire's harmony. This learn presents a readable and easy evaluate of the Roman military and, particularly, the connection among squaddies, their imperial commanders and the voters they have been presupposed to guard, from the third century BC to the fifth century advert. those centuries have been marked by way of growth and civil unrest as elements of the empire have been handled much less favourably than others and infantrymen weren't repaid. Santosuosso additionally appears at Augustus' profitable makes an attempt to reorganise the military, the mutual dependence of the emperor and his armies that undefined, the way of life and gear of squaddies, landmark battles and specific competitors. ultimately, the learn examines the defeat of the Roman military by the hands of a succession of invaders.

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Example text

35 Marius and his followers fled the city. C. 36 It was inevitable that Sulla would seek revenge after Marius returned from Africa and conducted his awful campaign against his enemies. C. while Sulla was still across the sea. Two years later Sulla was back on Italian soil. Appian opens the events to come with phrases that remind thereader of Xerxes’ march against Athens as described by Herodotus. ’ Ancient oracles were remembered. Abominable events took place: a mule foaled; a woman gave birth to a viper; an earthquake destroyed some of Rome’s temples; the Capitol, which the ancient kings had built centuries earlier, was destroyed by fire of unknown origin.

London, 1975),p. 275. 54. 3 1. 55. See Keppie, The Makingof the Roman Army, pp. 63-64. 56. 2. 57. 1-2. 58. 3-5. 59. See Brunt, Italian Manpower,esp. pp. 687-693. 60. , p. 688. 80. 62. Brunt,Italian Manpower,p. 689. 63. , p. 690. 64. Keppie,The Makingof the Roman Army,pp. 67-68. 65. Cf. L. R. Lind, “The Tradition of Roman Moral Conservatism,” in Studies in Latin Literature and Roman History, edited by Carl Deroux (Bruxelles, 1979), vol. 1, p. 7. 66. Santosuosso,Soldiers, Citizens, and the Symbolsof War, pp.

20. , p. 398. 2 1. 4. 22. Gabba, Esercito, pp. 24-25. C. 158-160. 24. They were identified as Celtic by some authors. , Lawrence Keppie, The Making of the Roman Army from Republic fo Empire (Norman, OK, 1998), p. 59. Certainly the Ambrones who fought at Aquae Sextiae must have spoken Celtic. It is more than likely that the rest were Germans. 25. Brunt, Italian Manpower, p. 82. 26. 3. 27. Gabba, Esercito,pp. 35-36. 28. Polybius vi. This is the usual interpretation of the Greek historian’s passage, but the manuscript line on the infantry is uncertain.

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Storming the Heavens: Soldiers, Emperors, and Civilians in the Roman Empire (History and Warfare) by Antonio Santosuosso


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